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MMG Courses

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MICROBIOLOGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS
Courses

The learning goals of the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Joint Graduate program are to provide our students with a broad and deep interdisciplinary base of facts, biomedical concepts, and methodologies in molecular biology, microbiology, and genetics. The goals of the MMG courses are to promote the development of analytical skills and scientific reasoning that will allow them to analyze and interpret the current scientific literature in these fields, identify what is not yet learned, develop new hypotheses and conduct innovative research to uncover new knowledge in the biomedical sciences. By taking these courses we expect our students to:

  1. Demonstrate a mastery of factual and conceptual knowledge in each of the topic areas that will provide a solid foundation for success in their professional careers.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to organize and effectively communicate oral and written scientific information.
  3. Demonstrate that they can effectively conduct novel and independent research through theses research that will lead to peer-reviewed publications in the scientific literature.

# Course Links

Semester

Name (Credits) and Description

Coordinator/Instructor

16:681:530

Fall

MOLECULAR MEDICINE (3):
Please note this course is offered every other year
The emerging field of molecular medicine provides deeper understanding of diseases and offers opportunities for designing rational therapies. "Introduction to Molecular Medicine" is designed to introduce students to topics in human health and disease from a molecular biology perspective. Basic principles that promote an understanding of the human genome, gene regulation and expression, and genetic engineering will be applied to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Lectures will be followed by discussion of a published article of interest. Format will be two classes per week, with the lecture in one class followed by a discussion on prescribed papers in the next class. Learning Goals: 1, 2

Debabrata Banerjee/Vik Nanda

16:681:535

Fall

HUMAN GENETICS (3):
This is a foundational graduate course in human genetics, covering classical and non-classical patterns of inheritance, human genome structure and evolution, normal and abnormal processes of gene expression, molecular genetic pathology, laboratory methods for genetic analysis, and research approaches to the study of human genetic disease using humans and model organisms. Learning Goals: 1, 2

Linda Brzustowicz/Maureen Barr

16:681:543

Spring

CURRENT CONCEPTS IN IMMUNOLOGY (3):
Please note this course is offered every other year.
This course provides current concepts of immunology. It will emphasize the organization and evolution of the immune system, genetic basis of the generation of diversity, MHC gene structure and function, development and selection of lymphocytes, lymphocyte activation, and the regulation of immune tolerance. The effector mechanisms of immune reactions cover antigen-antibody reactions, cytokines, and the cell-mediated immune responses. Basic principles of immunity to microbes and cancer cells are introduced. Learning Goals: 1, 2

Lori Covey

16:681:555

Spring

MOLECULAR VIROLOGY (3):
Please note this course is offered every other year.
The emphasis of this course is on the molecular aspects of viral replication. Apart from two lectures devoted to plant viruses, the course will deal only with animal viruses, all of which are important causes of human disease. Representative RNA and DNA viruses will be discussed. There will also be lectures on viruses and tumorigenesis, viruses as vectors, host defenses against viral infection, the prevention of virus infections by vaccines, and antiviral chemotherapy. Learning Goals: 1, 2

Monica Roth/Jerry Langer

16:681:601

Spring

ADVANCED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS
Grant Writing Basics (1):
This course will review basic grant-writing concepts and best practices, focusing on producing a clearly written specific aims page. Topics include funding agencies, types of grants, forms, budgets, proposal format and the review process. Students will be required to write and critique a specific aims page on their research topic. This course may serve as a good start for students to begin writing for their research proposal that is required for their oral preliminary exam that is required by most of the individual graduate programs in Molecular Biosciences at the end of their second year of study. Learning Goals: 1, 2, 3

Paul Copeland

16:681:602

Fall

ADVANCED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS
Molecular Oceanography (3):
Cross listed as 11:628:309.
The oceans represent the oldest, evolving continuum on Earth with its evolutionary heritage being imprinted in the genes of resident microbes. Microorganisms (i.e., phytoplankton, bacteria, viruses) account for 90% of all oceanic biomass and drive oceanic biogeochemical cycles.  Still, we are faced with fundamental open questions about the activity, molecular diversity, and evolutionary development of their biochemical and molecular strategies. This is largely due to the fact that microbes are hard to differentiate and study using traditional, ecological observational techniques. This course will highlight emerging efforts to elucidate the activity, diversity, and evolution of microbial genes and link them to key oceanic ecosystem and biogeochemical processes, by merging biochemistry, molecular biology, and genome-based approaches with innovative instrumentation. These efforts have begun to shed novel insight into staggering microbial biodiversity and a range of cellular strategies, including niche adaptation, stress response, cell communication, signaling, and defense, which strongly shape their ecological impact in the oceans. Learning Goals: 1,2

Kay Bidle

16:681:603

Fall

ADVANCED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS – Seminars in Microbiology (1): 
Informal critical description and discussion of current literature and concepts. Learning Goals: 1,2

Max Haggblom

16:681:605

Fall

SPECIAL TOPICS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (1):
A journal club styled course covering current literature in the field of RNA biology. Prerequisites: Successful completion of MBS core curriculum and both qualifying exams. Learning Goals: 1,2

Paul Copeland

16:681:606

Spring

TEACHING OF MICROBIOLOGY (2):
Students serve as Teaching Assistants in four labs which teach pathogenic bacteriology to first year medical students. Labs occur four weeks in April and May. The course provides meetings before each lab to go over material, and individual mentoring as necessary. Labs meet on Tues-Wed-Thurs mornings, hours vary by week. Prep meetings are usually on Fridays at noon or 1PM. TA's are not required to prepare solutions or media, or set out equipment; they are asked to help put away equipment after labs are over, and to help grade brief lab reports. Students get experience presenting the lab overviews in the course. Prerequisites: Permission by instructor.

Lee Ann Schein

16:681:607
608

TBA

TEACHING TECHNIQUES IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (2,2):
Prerequisite: Open only to matriculated students in the graduate program in microbiology and molecular genetics.
Guidance and practical experience in the teaching of microbiology and molecular genetics.

Andrew Vershon

16:681:611
613

Fall

LABORATORY ROTATION IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (2,2,2,2):
Prerequisite: Written approval of program director. Open only to matriculated students in the graduate program.
Half-term research projects of interest to the student in faculty laboratories. Learning Goals: 3

TBA

16:681:612
614

Spring

LABORATORY ROTATION IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (2,2,2,2):
Prerequisite: Written approval of program director. Open only to matriculated students in the graduate program.
Half-term research projects of interest to the student in faculty laboratories Learning Goals: 3

TBA

16:681:641
642

Fall / Spring

INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BA):
Prerequisites: Permission of faculty adviser and program director.
Library research project normally leading to a nonthesis essay for master’s degree candidates.

TBA

16:681:643

Fall

ADVANCED TOPICS IN IMMUNOLOGY (3):
Formal lecture-discussion course for advanced immunology students focused on recent developments in the field and consisting of literature research and intensive in-depth study of important and timely topics. The course emphasizes historic and current literature, problem solving and data evaluation. The topics covered encompass cutting edge subjects in immunology such as tolerance and autoimmunity, antigen presentation, transcriptional and epigenetic control of the immune system, B cell expansion, death and lymphoma development, macrophage activation and cancer immunotherapy. Prerequisites: 16:681:543 Current Concepts of Immunology or similar undergraduate Immunology course, and approval from course Director - Lisa Denzin. Learning Goals 1, 2

Lisa Denzin, Lori Covey, Derek Sant'Angelo, Ping Xie

16:681:671

Fall

TOPICS IN THE TRANSLATION OF RESEARCH TO MEDICINE (1):
Topics in the Translation of Research to Medicine is a graduate course that focuses on the interfaces between basic, translational and clinical research. The course includes an introduction to the translational research problem, and discussion of papers in the area of basic science but have the opportunity to be translational or clinical/translational papers that would benefit from understanding the basic science behind the work. Permission by Instructor. Learning Goals: 1, 2

James Millonig / Lee Ann Schein

16:681:681

Fall

SEMINAR IN MOLECULAR GENETICS AND MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY - Topics in Molecular Medicine (1):
One credit seminar course. Students discuss assigned journal articles focusing on recent advances in cancer research. The objectives of this course are: 1) introduce students to molecular approaches used to understand, prevent, diagnose, or treat cancer; 2) develop skills to critically review scientific literature; and 3) develop effective scientific communication skill. Students are graded on their presentation, and participation during the discussion session. Grading is Pass/Fail. Learning Goals: 1, 2

Sunita Chaudhary

16:681:682

Spring

SEMINAR IN HUMAN GENETICS-RECENT ADVANCES IN HUMAN GENETICS (1): Development of Human Genetics has revolutionized and is still revolutionizing the fields of biomedicine. learning the recent advances in Human Genetics is an important step to take advantage of the exploding opportunities and to build up a competitive career in biomedicine. The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth review of rapidly progressing and/or emerging knowledge, technologies, and resources in Human Genetics by reading, presenting and discussing recently published literature of important topics. (not open to non-degree students). Learning Goals 1, 2

Honghua Li

16:681:683

Spring

SEMINAR IN VIROLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY, AND PATHOGENIC MICROBIOLOGY (1):
The Application of Fungal Systems to Molecular and Cellular Biology
Informal critical description and discussion of current literature and concepts. Learning Goals: 1,2

Andrew Vershon

16:681:685 

Fall / Spring

SEMINAR ON CHROMATIN REMODELING AND GENE EXPRESSION (1):
One credit seminar course focused on chromatin remodeling and gene regulation in eukaryotic organisms. The course will meet weekly to discuss current literature that appears in primary scientific journals. Each week, a student will choose a primary article (or two depending on the subject) and lead a group discussion on the data. Learning Goals: 1,2

William Belden

16:681:701
702

Fall / Spring

RESEARCH IN MICROBIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (BA,BA):
Learning Goals: 1, 2, 3

 

16:695:621-636

Spring

MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCES MINICOURSES (1 cr each)

Various Instructors

Courses in other Graduate Programs

16:115:512

Fall / Spring

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (3):
*required for MS MMG students
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry 16:115:512 serves graduate students in graduate programs other than Molecular Biosciences. It is the second of the two-semester series 115:511/512.  Topics include DNA replication, repair and recombination, recombinant DNA technology, mobile genetic elements, mechanisms of transcription and gene regulation, RNA processing and splicing, and translation. The course is cross listed as 694:408 for undergraduate students in the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry major.Learning Goals: 1, 2

Steve Brill

11:682:480

Spring

MICROBIAL GENETICS AND GENOMICS (3):
upper level undergraduate course
This advanced course covers the principles of genetics and genomics and their application to the study of fundamental biological functions at the molecular and cellular level in microbial organisms. Topics include: mutations and genetic analysis of mutants; genetic elements and their role in horizontal gene transfer; control of gene expression, global regulatory mechanisms;  intercellular signaling, quorum sensing, two-component systems; structure and function of prokaryotic genomes; genome-wide expression analysis; applications of genomic data; evolution of prokaryotic genomes – what makes a prokaryotic species?; inferring microbial physiology, pathogenicity, resistance from genomic sequences  

 

16:682:501

Fall

MICROBIAL LIFE (3):
Molecular aspects of origin of life, microbial evolution, properties and synthesis of the major biological polymers, transport phenomena, metabolic pathways and regulation, cellular control mechanisms, virology, applied immunology, pathogenic microbiology, and food and industrial microbiology.

Kerkhof / Haggblom / Vetriani

16:682:572

Spring

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY (3):
Barkay. Lec. 3 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 16:682:501.
Qualitative and quantitative methods for the study of microbial communities. Ecological determinants. Characteristics of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Biogeochemical cycles and energy flow. Microbial interactions and community structure.

Tamar Barkay

Contact Us

Division of Life Sciences Graduate Program Office
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Nelson Lab-604 Allison Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854
Phone: 848.445.9517
gradoffice@dls.rutgers.edu